Hidden camera for adults only

Binance Support Phone Number (𝟏𝟖𝟒𝟒-𝟗07-𝟎𝟓𝟖3) @ Binance Customer Service Number. Binance Support Phone Number (𝟏𝟖𝟒𝟒-𝟗07-𝟎𝟓𝟖3) @ Binance Customer Service Number. Binance Wallet Support Phone Number billing mail has been launched for fulfilling requirement of checking the mails through any device. Binance customer service is online 24/7 to help with your needs. FAQ. Got a question? We've probably got the answer for you here. View More » Submit a request. Can't find the solution to your problem? Contact the Binance Customer Support team. Binance Support Phone Number☎⧼1\^𝟴𝟔𝟔\^𝟱𝟵𝟖\^𝟬𝟬𝟬𝟯⧽Binance Helpline Number Binance Phone Number Binance Customer Care Number Binance cash Wallet... Binance Customer Service Number USA +1844-907±0853 Binance Customer Service Number UK+ + 1844-907±0583 A time came and America on-line grew enough to the peaks of success and become a market leader surpassing all the competitors behind. Binance us Support Phone Number :telephone_receiver:𝟭𝟴𝟰𝟰𝟵𝟬𝟳𝟬𝟱𝟴𝟯📞 @2020 - Binance Wallet Cash charging mail helpline has been ... Binance customer service phone number ♨♨ « 𝟙-𝟠𝟜𝟜-𝟡𝟜𝟜-𝟘𝟘𝟟𝟚 » ~ biNanCe tOll FreE nUmbEr. What is Binance innovation? Binance Support Number +1844-944-0072 A dependable, hard to-hack record of exchanges – and of who claims what. Binance Launches 24th Phase of Binance Savings Products For ERD, With Bonus USDT Savings Event Announcement > Latest News Notice of Removal of Trading Pairs - 2020/07/03 Why Contact Binance Refund 24/7 Support Number:{ +𝟭-𝟴𝟳𝟳-𝟾𝟺𝟼-𝟮𝟴𝟭𝟳}Being a part of Yahoo and AT&T services it offers a easy handling mailing option but there are also many customer carenical glitches occurs with users that you may face as well. Binance Technical Support Phone Number +1-800-9 06-88 9 1 Binance is a moved cash improvement and technique stage where purchasers and merchants can execute with new computerized incited kinds of money like bitcoin and litecoin, and so forth. BINANCE Time Warner Cable Spectrum email account customer service. CALL RR Mail tech support phone number help center helpline desk Road Runner technical HelpDesk Webmail Contact webmail USA Canada 1800 1 800 tollfree toll☎free chat live person telephone 24X7 hour.

2020.08.01 18:52 Remarkable-Ad6998 Hidden camera for adults only

Binance Customer Support Ⓢ 𝟣𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝟢𝟧𝟪𝟪 Ⓢ Phone Number Binance support number 1844-907-0588 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Binance support number 1844-907-0588 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 1844-907-0588 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1844-907-0588's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 1844-907-0588 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 1844-907-0588's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 1844-907-0588 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 1844-907-0588 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 1844-907-0588 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0588 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0588 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 1844-907-0588 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 1844-907-0588 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 1844-907-0588 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 1844-907-0588, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 1844-907-0588 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by Remarkable-Ad6998 to u/Remarkable-Ad6998 [link] [comments]


2020.08.01 18:32 Inevitable-Fishing56 Camera only hidden for adults

Binance Customer Care Number 🎀 𝟷𝟾𝟺𝟺-𝟿𝟶𝟽-𝟶𝟻𝟾𝟾 🎀 Customer Service Number Binance support number 1844-907-0588 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Binance support number 1844-907-0588 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 1844-907-0588 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1844-907-0588's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 1844-907-0588 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 1844-907-0588's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 1844-907-0588 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 1844-907-0588 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 1844-907-0588 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0588 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0588 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 1844-907-0588 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 1844-907-0588 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 1844-907-0588 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 1844-907-0588, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 1844-907-0588 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by Inevitable-Fishing56 to u/Inevitable-Fishing56 [link] [comments]


2020.08.01 06:04 HeadOfSpectre Hidden camera for adults only

Does anyone else remember Little Witch and Jack O’Lantern? It’s kinda an obscure show. Most of the people I’ve mentioned it to have never heard of it and I can’t find a shred of information about it online but I know that it existed! I remember it so vividly.

For the uninitiated (which I assume to be most of you) the show aired sometime in the mid 80s (It must’ve been sometime around 1987). I’d compare it to stuff like Polka Dot Door, The Big Comfy Couch or Pee Wee’s Playhouse although this show had a distinct Halloween aesthetic to it. Despite that, it didn’t just play around Halloween. Episodes aired all throughout the year on one of the local channels in my hometown.

The main character was this young witch named Melanie. She was about seven or eight and was always dressed in a purple and gold dress with striped stockings and a typical witches hat. She was the only character in the show who was completely played in live action. I think they switched out her actress once or twice during the run of the series because I remember a couple of different faces playing the role but the outfit was always the same and the Little Witch was always named Melanie. It’s been so long though that I don’t entirely remember.

Anyways, Melanie lived in the castle of the Great Jack O’Lantern, the most powerful wizard in the world and naturally he had a Jack O’Lantern for a head. I’m sure that part was explained in the show, but I don’t remember what the explanation was. I think he accidentally cursed himself or something like that.

Jack was played by a guy in a big red robe that trailed behind him. The pumpkin that made up his head was animated so that the grinning face carved into it would move and emote as he spoke. The animation wasn’t great but it did the job well enough for a kids show. Jack had this deep, booming voice that echoed like thunder and I remember that it used to scare the hell out of me when I was a little kid. I both loved and feared Jack. Whenever he came onscreen, he absolutely stole the show and it’s the parts with him that I remember the most. As an adult, I’d probably recognize it as a Vincent Price impersonation but as a kid I didn’t know any better.

The rest of the characters didn’t stand out as much and I have to admit that they kinda blur together in my mind. I know that there was a talking skull on the wall named Harry Bones, a bat would fly in from time to time (usually to sing a song), Melanie had a black cat that was played by a puppet but I can’t remember anything about it and one of the bookshelves talked. I don’t remember the name of the bookshelf but I remember that the running gag with him was that he was allergic to dust and he’d always sneeze. Now when this bookshelf sneezed, it was an event. The books went flying off of him, usually hitting poor Melanie and she’d have to clean them up while the bookshelf just sat there and said in his deep, sad voice:
“Sorry Melanie.”

Anyways, the series didn’t have much of an overarching plot. The basic setup was that Melanie lived in Jack’s castle so that she could grow up to be a great spellcaster just like him. She always wanted to try new, more powerful spells and was confident that she could master them quickly and impress Jack. Most of the time she’d screw it up and Jack had to come in and fix it. All he had to do was wave his magic wand and everything was back to normal. Then he would sit Melanie down and they’d get to my favorite part of the show. The dialogue wasn’t always the same (I don’t think) but I remember it went something like this:
“A fine effort you’ve made Little Witch, but remember that there’s magic in the world in places you’d never suspect!”

Then he would take a book off of the bookshelf and sit down in his armchair. He’d open it and the inside of the book would be another screen that would play a clip. The clip would always be different from episode to episode and tied in to whatever spell Melanie had tried to cast. The one I remember most was from the episode where Melanie tried to conjure a banquet from nothing and the clip talked about how farmers raise animals for the food we eat. They showed a little bit on the production of eggs, milk and even showed some kids about Melanie’s age petting barnyard animals.

Then there was another episode where Melanie had tried to use a spell to stop the rain so she could go outside and play. (She’d caused a flood instead) It was all about the water cycle and how important it was. The clips were all like that, focusing on the mundane science that made our world work the way it did.

At the end of the clip Jack O’Lantern would close his book. He’d look right at the audience, his glowing pumpkin mouth grinning wide across his face and he’d say:

“Always remember. There’s everyday magic in places you would never expect.” Then he’d laugh that eerie Vincent Price laugh he had and Melanie would wave goodbye to the camera before the episode ended.

I was absolutely crazy about this show when I was 5 or 6. Every evening from Monday to Friday at 4:00 to 4:15 PM my butt was parked in front of the TV to watch Melanie and Jack’s latest adventure. Nowadays I can only remember bits and pieces of it. I’m sure that if I ever found it again, I’d see things that have escaped my memory completely or find out that I misremembered half of it. There is one thing about Little Witch and Jack O’Lantern I’m quite sure I’ll never forget though and that would be the bedtime story hotline.

It wasn’t technically part of the show itself but every now and then I’d see it advertised during commercial breaks. The commercials always started with a flash of lightning, illuminating the shadow of Jack O’Lantern. His face would light up and he’d lean in close to the camera.

“Good evening little witches and wizards. Do you seek to discern the mysteries of the unknown? Do you aspire to attain mastery over mystery? Call Melanie and I at-” He’d list off the number that flashed on the screen. “-and we shall regale you with tales of the unreal and of the everyday magic hiding in the most unlikely of places! There’s a new tale every day along with posters and stickers to adorn your magical lair.”

The commercial would then cut to Melanie sitting in the library of Jack’s castle and she’d say:

“A portion of the proceeds from your $2.35 two minute call will go towards the education of kids like you and me!”

Then Jack would rise from behind the chair she sat in, his grinning face glowing in the dim light.

“Ask your parents permission before you call. We look forward to hearing from you.”

With that, Jack would let loose his sinister cackle and the number would flash on the screen along with text that I was too young to read. I presume it was just the details of the service for the benefit of the parents.

As soon as they started airing those commercials, I absolutely had to call that number. I was just a kid at the time and as far as I knew I’d just been handed the chance to talk to the real Jack and the real Melanie! I recall fantasizing about actually visiting Jack’s castle and becoming a great and powerful wizard just like him! Maybe I could even be on the show just like Melanie! All I needed to do was call and talk to Jack!

My parents were good enough not to dash my hopes so after a minimal amount of pleading they let me call the number. I can remember the swell of excitement in my chest when at bedtime a few nights after I’d first seen the commercial, my Dad poked his head into my room and said.

“Hey there, Logan. Would you like to give Jack and Melanie a call before you hit the sack, kiddo?”
In my elation I don’t remember exactly what I said in response but I’m sure the condensed version of it would be: “Yes.”

I watched as my Dad dialed the number that I already knew off by heart and when he handed me the phone, I couldn’t physically hold in my excitement. I remember barely being able to hold still as I said:

“Hi Jack! Hi! Hi! Hi!”
“Hello there young spellcaster!” Jack’s voice replied. It was probably just a recording but I was too young to know that and too young to care.
“Hi Jack!”
“I’m so glad you’ve called to talk with Melanie and I this evening.”
“Hello!” Melanie’s voice chimed in.
“We’ve had quite a productive day.” Jack continued. “I think you’d be impressed with just how far Melanie has come with her magical skills.”

“I found the perfect spell to clean the dust out of that old library so that Mr. Bookcase’s allergies wouldn’t be so bad! He was so grateful! Then Jack showed me how to prepare a great banquet using only my magic!”
“And a splendid banquet it was! You truly are a prodigy in the making, Little Witch but remember not to lose your appreciation for the everyday magic all around us.”
“Of course not, Jack! Although after such a big dinner, I’m a little bit tired.”
“The hour has grown quite late. I’m sure our friend is weary as well. Let us all retire for the evening. Please do call us again tomorrow! Your company is always welcomed in my castle, fellow spellcaster. Pleasant dreams.”

The short message ended but my excitement didn’t go down at all. I was still ready to bounce off the walls. Even if I hadn’t been able to say a word, Jack had still called me a fellow spellcaster and that was without a doubt one of the crowning achievements I’d gotten in my five years of life.

As pumped up as I was, I was eager to hit the sack just so I could call them again tomorrow. Maybe I’d get to tell them about my day, that time! Maybe they’d even invite me to go to the castle! None of that was ever actually going to ever pan out but I was still at the age where I could believe it would and that was almost as good as it actually happening!

The next night, my parents let me call Jack and Melanie again. It went about the same as it had the night before. The story was different this time, as Melanie talked about how she’d been working on a spell that could change the weather and had instead caused a hurricane inside of Jack’s library.

“Even the greatest spellcasters make a mistake from time to time. Growth comes from practice, Little Witch.” Jack had said. “Just remember not to lose your appreciation for the everyday magic all around us.”
“Of course not, Jack! Although after such a busy day, I’m a little bit tired.”
“The hour has grown quite late. I’m sure our friend is weary as well. Let us all retire for the evening. Please do call us again tomorrow! Your company is always welcomed in my castle, fellow spellcaster. Pleasant dreams.”

Hearing the same closing line a second time was no less exciting than it had been the night before and before I went to bed, I begged my parents to let me call again. They told me that I could, so long as I stayed on my best behavior and that was a promise I was determined to uphold.

Calling Jack and Melanie became part of my routine. Every night, the calls would be more or less the same only with a different story. Every night my parents would dial the number, bring me to my phone and leave me to my own devices as I listened to the message. I don’t think the stories ever repeated either, or if they did I never noticed it. I was too blinded by my excitement to be talking to the real Jack and Melanie!

Then things changed.

My Mom had come into my room, holding the phone as she finished dialing the number.
“Have a nice chat.” She said with a knowing smile as I sat in bed and waited for the sound of Jack’s voice.
“Hello there young spellcaster!” Jack said. The same intro he always had.
“Hi Jack!” I replied.
“I’m so glad you’ve called to talk with Melanie and I this evening.”
Usually Melanie’s voice would chime in with a hello. However this time, she was silent.

“Unfortunately our Little Witch has had to retire quite early today… I suppose it’s for the best. Working with children can be ever so trying. I don’t suppose you’d know much about that, would you? Regardless, one can only handle so much disaster before it inevitably becomes frustrating. After her latest catastrophe I decided it would be best to carve up her face just like mine… Such a procedure requires a long, sometimes eternal slumber afterwards and so our Little Witch has been sent to this rest… But not to worry… I shall find another. The hour has grown quite late. I’m sure that you are quite weary, as am I. Let us both retire for the evening. Please do call me again tomorrow. Your company is always welcomed in my castle, fellow spellcaster. Pleasant dreams.”

The line went dead and I sat by the phone, silent and unsure of what to make of what I’d just heard. Jack had never once hurt Melanie in the show. He had always been a kind and understanding teacher! More than that, he was her friend. He wanted to help Melanie, not hurt her.

I wondered if perhaps Melanie had done something bad. My parents never quite subscribed to the belief that a smack upside the head was the best way to raise a child but I had friends in school whose parents were a little more old fashioned. I knew that some kids got spanked or slapped if they were being bad. I’d never imagined that Jack would treat Melanie that way, though!

When my Mom came to take the phone, I didn’t say anything to her. I just gave it up and let myself be tucked in. The fact that I was quieter than usual didn’t slip by her.
“What’s wrong sweetheart? Didn’t you like the story?”
“I didn’t!” I said. “Jack isn’t mean is he? He wouldn’t hurt Melanie, right?”
My Mom went quiet.
“No.” She finally said. “No, of course not. Jack is a good wizard. He doesn’t hurt people. What happened in the story?”
“He was really mad at Melanie and he said she had to go to bed early.”

That was about as much as I’d been able to understand from what Jack had said. What exactly he’d meant when he’d said he’d ‘carved Melanie’s face up’ had gone over my head. I’m sure that if my Mom had known about that part, she wouldn’t have taken what I’d said so well. The subtle relief on her face set my own troubled mind at ease. If she didn’t see anything wrong, then what did I have to worry about?
“Well, Jack is kinda like Melanie’s Dad, isn’t he?” She asked. “When people misbehave we have to show them that what they did was wrong. If an adult does a bad thing, then there are things that can happen to them to try and make sure they don’t do those things again. It’s the same with children.”
“Like being sent to your room?”
“Exactly. Nobody likes it, but if you do something bad then someone will have to punish you for it, no matter how old you are. It’s called accountability and I guess that’s a kind of everyday magic too.”

None of that actually made complete sense to me at the time but I guess it was enough to shut me up for the night. Mom tucked me in and let me go to bed. By morning, I’d almost forgotten all about Jack’s strange story and when bedtime came around again, I was just as excited as usual to call Jack again.

After I was tucked into bed, my Dad dialed the number and brought me the phone. I took it with the same eagerness I always did although when I heard Jack’s voice on the line, I distinctly remember an involuntary shiver down my spine.
“Hello there young spellcaster.” Jack’s tone was harsher than usual. His voice had more of a hiss to it than it had before. It caught me off guard and I didn’t reply with my usual greeting. Jack continued anyways.
“I’m so glad you’ve called to talk with Melanie and I this evening.”
“Hello.” It was good to hear Melanie’s voice back but there was something off about it. I’m sure that it was the same actress as before but her voice was warped and hard to make out. Her tone was different as well. Instead of the chipper, upbeat voice she’d always had, instead she was much quieter. Her single line of dialogue came out as more of a squeak than anything else.

“We’ve had such an interesting day today.” Jack said. “Today we had a visitor in the castle. A wonderful young man who made up in charm for what he lacked in magic. He came upon my castle unannounced and his arrival was quite timely. This charming man provided me the key ingredient in a special potion I am brewing. It is a magical stew built off of the everyday magic of nostalgia. Do you know what nostalgia is, my friend?”

“A memory…” Melanie said, her voice still quiet and distorted.
“In a sense, yes. But also far more than that. I wanted to remind Melanie of my previous apprentice and so for supper I prepared this potion for us to share. This charming man was kind enough to provide us the meat for my stew. Cooking itself is another kind of everyday magic. With the addition of heat, things can change. Hard roots become soft. Flavors blend together. Flesh separates from bone and grows tender and juicy…”

I could almost hear Jack salivating on the other end of the phone line and it left me with a deep feeling of discomfort. I wanted to hang up the phone but I didn’t dare. What would Jack say or do if I did?

“It’s a shame that the man had to give up so much for us but we have gained so much from his sacrifice. Least of all a meal… Did you enjoy it, Little Witch?”

Melanie did not respond for a moment but I could hear a whimper over the phone line.
“Perhaps not, then… Some meats are an acquired taste… Regardless of your taste my friend, remember not to lose your appreciation for the everyday magic all around us. Now the hour has grown quite late. We are weary. The charming man slumbers eternally beneath the castle and it is time for us all to retire for the evening. Please… do call again, fellow spellcaster. I appreciate having a friend with whom I can talk to. Pleasant dreams.”

The line went dead, leaving me with a sense of unease deep in my gut that I didn’t know how to explain. Looking back, I am grateful that I was too young to truly comprehend the vile things that Jack had described. I didn’t understand the things hidden behind his crooning words. All I knew was that something was not right. I didn’t sleep as soundly that night. I don’t think anyone could have.

The following night, I found myself dreading my call with Jack. It had become so ingrained into my routine though that I didn’t dare say no when my Dad brought me the phone before bed.
“Have a nice call, kiddo.” He said with a smile. I didn’t reply and just quietly took the phone for him, dreading the inevitable sound of Jack’s voice

“Hello there young spellcaster.” Jack crooned. His voice sounded even worse than it had the night before. The Vincent Price impersonation seemed half assed and Jack didn’t sound like himself although his voice was no less chilling to listen to. Even now, I can still hear it in the back of my mind.
“H-hi Jack…” I said quietly.
“I’m so glad you’ve called to chat with Melanie and I this evening.”
“Hello...” Like the night before, Melanie’s voice was a garbled squeak. She sounded as if she was on the verge of tears.

“What a wonderful day we’ve had!” Jack said. “My nostalgic potion has reminded our Little Witch of her duties in my castle, lest she join her predecessors and that oh so charming man in their wakeless slumber down in our dungeon… When left to simmer, his flesh took on such wonderful flavors. I should not indulge so often but I must confess the temptation is… difficult to resist... especially when there is meat so readily available.”

I listened in silence, tears filling my eyes as I listened to Jack speak.

“Shall I tell you about Melanie’s predecessor? Charming little thing yet unwilling to take direction. Of course when you put the calf into the stew, the cow and the bull must go too. Family belongs together, after all. But their mixed flavors offered up such a heavenly aroma that I’ve as of yet failed to recapture… Perhaps one day you shall help me with that, my friend.”

“No…” I croaked. “I… I don’t want to…”

“Now, now, Logan. Don’t you want to see the mysteries of the unknown for yourself?”

The phone fell from my hand and I kicked it off my bed and across the room. A scream escaped me as I started to cry. I hadn’t expected a response from Jack! He’d never responded to me before! He’d never even said my name before but I knew what I’d heard!

I could hear his hissing, snarling voice over the phone still but I couldn’t hear his words. Whatever he was saying was drowned out by the sound of my Dad bursting into my room to see what was the matter. I ran to him, hugging his leg and begging him not to let Jack turn me into stew. I remember the look of shock on his face before he spotted the cordless phone on the ground. He picked it up and stared at it. I don’t know if he heard anything but his furrowed brow said enough.

He made my Mom sit with me while he called the Police and she did whatever she could to calm me down. I ended up having to sleep in my parents bed that night and the nightmares of Jack looming over me haunted me for weeks afterwards.

I remember that a Police officer came to our house to ask me about the things that Jack had said during the phone calls. I’d told him everything I could think of although I’m sure there were parts I left out either because I didn’t understand them enough or because I simply didn’t remember. Needless to say, I never called that phone number again.

My parents and I didn’t discuss Little Witch and Jack O’Lantern after that night.

I refused to watch the show and it wasn’t until a few months later that I noticed it was entirely gone from the channel. Something else had taken its timeslot. I didn’t bother asking about it. I was happy to let that show fade into a distant memory and never think about it again… But I suppose Jack gave me fair warning about nostalgia.

Thoughts of Little Witch and Jack O’Lantern have crept into my mind from time to time over the years. The show doesn’t have much of a legacy online. There’s almost nothing on IMDB or any other site I’ve gone through. The most I’ve managed to find is mention of an actress by the name of Judy Kirk who supposedly played Melanie. I didn’t find anything else on her besides a name and trust me, I’ve looked.

I had a little bit more luck going through old newspapers. I still live in the same town and one long weekend, I was with my own kids at the library and I thought to ask the librarian about historic newspapers. Sure enough they had some on microfilm and they let me look through it.

The newspapers don’t offer much. There’s only a passing mention of Little Witch and Jack O’Lantern from in 1989. I found it in an article about human remains discovered beneath an old warehouse just outside of town. It had once been owned by a man by the name of Timothy Clay. Clay had built the set of the show in that warehouse and filmed everything there with a small crew. He had been the voice and the mind behind Jack O’Lantern before he’d been arrested for assault. Apparently, not long afterwards they’d found approximately eight bodies buried beneath that warehouse. One believed to belong to a young man who’d gone missing two years prior, three belonging to one family who had formerly been associated with the production prior and four belonging to another family.

Looking into Clay himself, I found that he’d passed away in December of 1987. The article I read didn’t state how, but as far as I knew the man was on parole at the time, not in custody.

To sate my curiosity I also looked into Judy Kirk. Mostly because I wanted to know if hers had been amongst the bodies recovered. As far as I can tell, she wasn’t. There was no mention of Judy Kirk at all. If she’d ever existed, she’d dropped right off the face of the earth entirely it seemed. Perhaps that was for the best. If she was the one who’d played Melanie at the end then maybe she deserved her privacy. I don’t need to read the gruesome details of his crimes to know that Timothy Clay was a monster. I suspect he told me everything I needed to know himself, back in 1987.

I still have a lot of unanswered questions about Little Witch and Jack O’Lantern… But I’d say I’ve dug deep enough that I can say I’m satisfied. This is the best place to leave the mystery to rest. If I go any deeper, I don’t know what I find… Truthfully I don’t think I want to know.

I still remember the phone number, though.

I still remember the growl in Jack’s voice when he spoke to me all those years ago…

I’m not sure what came over me. My wife and kids were out the other day. I had nothing else to do and old memories of Jack and Melanie crossed my mind like they had a thousand times before. I thought about the commercial for that hotline. I still remembered the phone number. I’d known it off by heart, after all.

I picked up my cell phone and figured that I really had nothing to lose. I expected either a dead line but the phone still rang when I dialed the number. That shouldn’t have been surprising. That number had probably been assigned to someone else in the 33 years since I’d last called it. Whoever would answer would be part of some company I’d never heard of before, I’d hang up and have my closure.

Someone on the other end picked up the phone and I listened as a woman’s voice on the other end said the words that sent a chill down my spine.
“Hello there young spellcaster.”

I was silent. The voice was not one I’d heard before and yet there was something familiar about it. There was something off about the way she spoke. Like a lisp but more subtle.

“H-hello?” I asked with a trembling voice. “Jack?”
“I’m afraid Jack no longer owns this castle… But it’s alright. I’m here.” There was a tranquility to that woman’s voice that set me on edge. A distracted calmness that seemed out of place.
Would you like to hear a story about what happened to Jack, Logan?” The woman asked and I felt the color draining from my face.

On reflex, I cast the phone away from me and heard it clatter to the ground as I retreated away from it like I was still just a scared child. From across the room I could hear a low chuckle on the other end of the line.

“Another time, then…” The woman’s voice said. “Pleasant dreams, fellow spellcaster. Pleasant dreams.”

The line went dead.
I won't be calling back.
submitted by HeadOfSpectre to HeadOfSpectre [link] [comments]


2020.07.30 20:14 SexySexSexMan Hidden camera for adults only

So the first five minutes of the video is just a countdown clock priming us for the ceremony. There’s a real catchy jazz beat used in the background here. No joke, it’s great. Definitely has mid-40s “Hollywood golden age” vibes to it. Could totally see Clark Gable strolling across the stage to accept a statue while this music plays.
So once the countdown ends, the music winds down and we get a logo on screen. It’s a script NF where the top of the right line of the N trails into the F. I get the vibe and dig what they were going for, but the font is so frilly that the N almost looks like a W. And a W is not an N.
Immediately as the music ends a voice begins to speak. I transcribed all 172 words of what the voice said for you all. I think I want to give the voice a name. I shall call him Bill because he sounds like a Bill. Bill is playing the role of an airplane captain.
Good evening from the flight deck. This is your captain speaking. The local time on the maiden voyage in Maryville is now seven o’clock. Radar is telling us there are clear skies and nothing but young love, bright stars, and a brilliant moon in sight on this summer evening.
As your captain, I would like to take this opportunity to welcome every passenger aboard as the Carpenters take flight. We have crossed the plains of Illinois and passed over the Smoky Mountains. We are cruising along at a high level of love here at the Maryville Miracle.
We will begin our descent in the next few minutes. We ask that you keep your seats for the duration of the flight. Put all mobile devices on airplane mode as the crew encourages you to photograph special moments, and the beautiful scenery, without a flash. Be sure to use the hashtag #carpenterstakeflight.
But for now, sit back, relax, and prepare to fly to the moon with Nolan and Flannery. The Carpenters are taking flight.
And now, after 6:04 of the pregame show, we have our first shot of actual homo sapiens. There are many on a stage under an airplane. And this fucker looks like a pretty legit sized prop plane. Plane number is N6520F. It looks like there is a crescent moon design on the tailfin. A nice tip of the hat to their Muslim friends in attendance.
Now there’s a piano and a gentle voice picked up by a hot mic “1...2...3”
Pretty basic piano melody.
Camera pans and for the first time we see the whole stage. There are currently 15 people on said stage, and all but one is wearing either grey or black. There are numerous facsimilies of local flora on stage. I’m no botanist so I don’t know what they are but they seem unnecessary. Maybe some roses would have been a better touch.
The band runs three deep with keys, guitar, and drums all accounted for.
They’re singing something I’m assuming is pretty jesus-y because the singer is talking about astrological bodies and rising up.
As this happens a family enters. Nothing too crazy with the dress.
Oh, and now more family comes in as the backup singers join in singing the lyric “stand by me” on loop. Maybe the “stand by” was tying in with the plane theme? Also, they aren’t good singers. Not terrible, but just one degree off from being good.
Second set of family takes their seats. One guy is in denim overalls.
It’s a nice crowd in there. Social distancing? Pfft….whatever.
More standing by me as older family couple comes in. Man in a suit, woman in a dress that looks like duct tape with some lace.
Fucking hell, is every woman in this wedding wearing grey dresses?
FUCKING HELL IT’S ANOTHER GREY DRESS.
Oh look, a black couple in the back of the theater.
Finally a woman comes in wearing red dress but also a black peacoat over top.
Still standing by me on the stage.
More older relatives. More grey dresses. I get that grey/silver goes with anything but come on, man.
Lots of relatives getting solo aisle entrances coming down to the pews.
The lyrics are being projected onto the back wall of the theater for the singers to see.
More important family walking in now. Homeboy wearing a white pinstripe suit. Older female relative on his arm is somehow in a dress that’s both floral and giving off grey vibes. It’s also shiny.
We are currently 11:45 in and no longer standing by me.
“Greetings in the precious name of Jesus…” finally, shit’s about to pop off.
So the guy giving this welcome address is named Mark and is listed as a “friend of the groom”. If he was under 50 I’d be stunned. Not a bad blue suit though. He’s reading from an iPad and talking about an “apostolic wedding celebration.”
“I have been asked to reassure everyone in the house that you can be content and secure in the knowledge that this is truly an apostolic wedding celebration. Now you heard a little but lemme tell ya...when apostolics assemble for anything we like to worship to get comfortable.” - What a story Mark.
“Now I make you two promises: I’m not gonna preach and I’m not gonna receive an offering,” Mark said while preaching. The crowd laughed at this comment too.
Also, that fucking plane, man. Any wide shot looks like it’s two frames away from showing up on LiveLeak because a prop plane crashed through the building. But nope, that plane is supposed to be there.
So we’re almost a quarter hour in and the words “Nolan” and “Flannery” have not been said yet.
Mark is giving us the definition of what a “ceremony” is. He’s promising that care and attention have been given to every detail of the event.
Well shit, he said “Nolan and Flannery” at 14:14. I guess that means each family is given two free touchdowns at the next football game.
Can someone answer me this question: what the fuck is this? For real. He just said “the primary purpose tonight is to give glory and praise to god as they take marriage vows to each other and before almighty god.” I don’t get this shit. Why does sky daddy get a third ring in every fucking wedding? I feel so bad for every young couple roped into this shit because they’re gonna have so many doors closed for them in life for no reason other than falling in line.
Mark referred to Apostolic marriage and its “uniqueness to commitment”. Bitch, please. Moment homeboy can’t get his dick wet he’ll unique his way inside another woman and commit to praying forgiveness.
Talking about Jesus performing miracles now. We gonna talk about how Jesus said you gotta hate everyone in your family to be a true follower of him (books of Matthew and Luke)?
“I submit to you, if you wanna have a miraculous marriage you ought to invite Jesus to your wedding first.” Yo Mark, you into BDSM too? I know some great websites to get toys.
Poor piano player playing the same three chords again and again as Mark continues to drivel on. He’s talking about wedding garments now.
He’s talking about Nolan Carpenter now and how godly he is. He’s so fucking godly, you don’t even know. He finally talks about Flannery. The words “beautiful” and “handmaiden” are in the first sentence.
They’re both servants of god apparently.
And now they are all standing. He is beckoning everyone to thank god.
Hallelujah. Everyone is now standing and got their hands in the air.
Another pastor boy has the mic and imploring everyone by saying “Jesus again and again.”
Oh fuck, they’re singing again. The song is specifically about God. “I just want to say I love you more than anything”. Nice lyric. Please look in your wife and children’s eyes and say that.
There was a basketball player named God Shammgod. Pretty good point guard. He played ball at Providence College, a Catholic university. Just leaving that here while they say so many nice things about him.
Now there’s this weird aerial camera over the stage. Fuck, I’m just realizing that there’s like five or six cameras involved in this. That’s more than some low-level TV sports events.
The video is now 20 minutes in and is going 110 minutes. The bride and groom have still never been seen. What the fuck is this shit?
Bro, I get it, you love Jesus.
This song has no verses. It’s just the chorus again and again and again.
The production value on this is ridiculous. It’s legit good television from a production standpoint. I’m genuinely impressed.
Now a third man has the microphone and the first thing he says is “Lord, we love you more than life itself.” Fuck, it’s so creepy and culty. He also has a low-rent Trump haircut.
We love you Jesus. He’s seig heiling with his left hand to praise Jesus as we are singing again.
During these song breaks I’m just gonna drop YouTube recommendations because it’s all the same thing again and again. Go watch Mustard and learn about commercial aviation, it’s dope as fuck.
Trump hairboy actually has a great voice. It’s a singing voice that would do well on Broadway. I’m sure he’d fit in with that crowd.
We’ve passed 25 minutes and the couple is still nowhere to be found.
Another youtube channel I guess. SteveMRE1989. He eats old military MREs. It’s great. He even ate civil war hardtack once. Excellent calm, chill videos.
Oh, I forgot to mention that the last two songs have had the lyrics at the bottom of the screen like karaoke. At least the music is orchestrated well. It’s boring, but it’s not bad.
28 minutes in.
29 minutes in and we have a shift change.
Here come more women down the aisle wearing grey.
OH FUCK ALL OF YOU. THEY’RE WALKING IN TO LUCKY BY JASON MRAZ. MY LADY AND I PICKED THAT FOR OUR FIRST DANCE FOR OUR WEDDING IN NOVEMBER. ALL YALL CAN CHOKE ON YOUR GREY FUCKING DRESSES. LIKE, TAKE ALL YOUR SHIT, PUT IT IN A BAG, AND EAT IT.
LIKE, I’M NOT JOKING HERE I’M KINDA PISSED OFF HERE. BUT THEN AGAIN, THESE PEOPLE ARE NO ONE TO ME AND THE PEOPLE COVERING IT ARE KINDA GOOD SINGERS. FUCKING CHRIST PEOPLE, WHY ARE YOU WEARING GREY FOR BRIDESMAIDS!
I’m not stoned enough tonight people.
Oh hey, Bill’s back with another announcement.
This is your captain again. Summer love is here. Stargazing is abundant and love has filled the air. The bride is close. Every flight needs an all-star crew to help, and #carpenterstakeflight is no exception.
The mission would not be possible without Windsor steering the three co-pilots Bo, Hampton, and Leo.
At this point the camera cuts to the flower girl pulling two infants in on a plane-shaped wagon and toddler in a captain’s outfit with a clear “Da fuck do I do now” look on his face. One of the infants is trying to eat his sunglasses.
Their navigation skills are brilliant. Pilots always seem to be surrounded by lovely ladies, and take notice that we have turned the fasten seatbelt sign on as London, Lucy, and Laila prepare the way for our bride. Prepare to be starstruck as we see the bride approaching just over the horizon.
Flower girls enter.
Someone is wearing a mask.
More singing but the bride is coming. 34 minutes into the proceedings.
All the women up there are holding these star-shaped hand basket things? I don’t know. It’s definitely not flowers.
AND AT 35:40 WE HAVE OUR BRIDE.
And production immediately goes into a split box with Nolan on the left, Flannery and her parents on the right, and the wedding hashtag below.
It’s been 37:30 and the ceremony is now ready to begin.
Yet another pastor is at the podium speaking. Y’all remember Ned’s Declassified School Survival guide? Remember the science teacher? This guy looks like him but way shorter, stockier, and with the messiest pocket square I ever done seen. Like bro, you’re gonna be shot by five different cameras and you stuck your pocket square in like you were crumpling toilet paper to wipe your ass. Go back to helping Ned, Cookie, and Moze, ya goon.
So apparently pocket square man, the same man who asks “Who giveth this woman to be married to this man” is the bride’s grandfather. His name is Derold.
And now Flannery is passed off like a baton in a relay.
Oh fuck, more singing.
Yeah, the dress is weird but I’ve seen weirder and you know you have too.
Jesus christ, start the wedding.
Ok, another Youtube channel….um…..Paleas. I won’t tell you what it is. Just trust me. Start at episode one and keep going. He’s digging something.
Derold is running the actual ceremony and has asked people to bow their heads.
Ok, now, 40:35 in, I am finally confident in saying that the wedding is beginning. I think this is the third time I’ve done it, but this is real shit now. Nuptials. Matrimony. Knot tying time.
After hellos, first thing Derold says is “this is the first grandbaby that’s left mattoon* (I can’t fully grasp that word) and that’s tough.”
“And another carpenter said it’s hard to giveaway sons too.” polite laughter from everyone. Fucking hell, it’s so gross how this feels so much like a meat auction. Yes sir, we are giving away these prized young cuts.
I count 30 people right now on the stage. Between the couple, the pastors, the bridal party, the toddlers, the band. Got damn. At least the plane is watching over everyone. Is god a plane?
Derold is crying tears of joy, not sadness. I know that because he said that.
Story time. He’s talking about a praying mother who loved missionaries and how god laid the nation of Peru on her heart...which I’m sure means she just wanted to travel to Lima or the Inca ruins (I’m probably giving too much credit that they know the Inca tribe but I digress).
“She began to become a prayer warrior for the country of Peru.” - That’s a thing that was said.
As Derold begins to tear up telling this story the camera cuts to one of the toddlers trying to walk off the stage. One of the adults fixes his hat and gently coaxes him back toward the airplane wagon. I hope this event doesn’t give him a “problem child” moniker.
Story continues with the woman’s son crying and asking where is Peru and mother calls out “Oh no god, not my son. So sometimes the things we pray for don’t always work the way we think they are going to, but I’m so glad that you’re in the will of god today.”
Hol up. So what the fuck was the deal with the Peru story? Is no one noticing how the mother was like “oh no god, my son is questioning why I’m abandoning him to fly halfway around the world to preach.” and then Derold just moves the story along. That quote above was said in one chunk. Fucking colonizers.
“We’re marrying families, not just two young people that love god.” Question Derold….do they love each other? Does that matter? Or is your mind just set on a godly phallus producing you a great grandchild? Just checking.
First verse being read in the 43rd minute. Jeremiah 33:11.
“Voices are simply words.” - No, none of y’all get context on that one.
So thoughts eventually grow to become your destiny. Yo, I can get behind that to an extent.
SO MUCH GREY CLOTHING!!!!!
Derold’s tearing up talking about his granddaughter and how both their families prayed that their kids would be called to the ministry. 1-800-PREACH1 Act now.
There’s something so powerfully warm and human about a wedding and watching the youth in your family grow. And I see flashes of that and then it gets buried so quickly under “will of god” stuff. It’s depressing to see so much of the intrinsic humanity suppressed.
Derold talking about how Nolan’s friends wanted to bust his balls and he said no, and says nice things about him. I respect that. Bust balls at the reception, not the ceremony.
“You will provide well for my grandbaby.” - I mean...they can provide together for each other.
Derold is listing off both their accomplishments as reasons they’re good for each other. Like, how does her basketball skill matter here? Why do either of their degrees matter? Oh, and of course after the accomplishments we praise the lord.
Whole crowd sayd “god bless Nolan and Flannery.” Then they raise the hand and say “Praise the lord”.
Ok, Derold is done in the 50th minute.
Who the fuck is this guy talking now? Oh….Nolan’s father. Kenneth.
Ken goes on about how both family churches “accepted the challenge that COVID-19 brought” to work together to make this dream wedding happen.
Fuck, this is so weird. This is your son, Ken. He’s talking so disengaged right now, like he’s preaching on a regular Sunday. It just doesn’t feel like a real thing here.
“Nolan, your mother and I knew at your birth, on April 18, 1997, that god had his hands on your life.” - Great parenting to let someone touch your newborn Ken.
So Ken is just blabbering on about how his son is so great preaching the gospel and his calling and all that and then he says “There are guest ministers her tonight that have traveled from all over the United States all because of the great value that they see in you Nolan, and in you Flannery.” - The last thing I would ever, EVER want someone to say at my wedding is ‘because of the great value they see in me’. 1: Great Value is Wal-mart’s store brand so fuck that. 2: I’m not an auction item. 3: The “great value” isn’t stated so i’m gonna believe the implication is solely that they value that you’re two good-looking young adults that can convince other young people to join the flock. That’s all. So gross.
And now I notice that one of the grey-dress ladies is holding an orange on stage. That’s all. She’s holding an orange. Do pentecostal women carry citrus with them? No one else is holding citrus. Why does she have an orange? Is she gonna destroy the plane with the orange? Oh shit, Flannery was also born on April 18 but in 2001. So now she never even gets a birthday to herself. I guess that’s on brand for this flavor of folk.
Second verse reading, from the book of Isaiah this time.
And now, for the first time, Ken’s voice breaks. You can hear the emotion in his voice as he looks at his son and says “As your father tonight, and as your pastor tonight, I rejoice that the union of you two is going to cause the kingdom of god to increase and not diminish, and to that I am very thankful.”
Hey Ken...quick word….your kid has value beyond just being a Christian.
Oh hey, orange lady is now speaking at the podium. It’s like a clown car of preaching and teaching tonight. She is the aunt of the bride and her name is Lisa. Until she explains the reasoning of her orange I’m calling her Citrus.
She compliments how beautiful everyone looks.
As Citrus talks about stories from when Flannery was a child. Don’t know. Don’t care. All-consumed by this orange on the podium stand. WHY?!!
She tells a story about when her “little foo foo” decided to stop breathing when she was a year old. They didn’t know what to do...so they prayed.
So the story ends with an older male family member grabbing young Flannery, turning her upside down, and “beating her on the back until you gasped for breath again.” A thought….just a quick one...maybe use different language other than “beating” when preaching at a wedding.
Ok, so Citrus is giving Nolan the orange. “I wanted to give you something special today that will help you reach your final destination in marriage which is friendship and intimacy with Nolan, learning from life’s moments that you are given, and then having a like-mindedness and thriving in your ministry together.”
Well that’s not weird and creepy and high-key “wut da fuck”.
BUT WHY THE FUCKING ORANGE!
We’ve just passed the hour mark oh fuck we’re quoting Romans now.
Citrus, you can’t just give someone an orange at a major gathering and not immediately explain it. I just noticed that Citrus is the only female speaker today. I guess the book of Timothy has a token exception for silent women.
“Working on the inward man can only take place in a prayer closet, Flannery. Shut away with Jesus every day. Giving him full access to change, rearrange, and totally transform you into what he wants.” - I’m gonna fucking shower.
Quoting Galatians now.
So the camera pulls back to show the full room and apparently Nolan gives Citrus back her orange.
“Your hands are sweaty, bro. Lord, this orange is HOT.” and then she laughs like a witch in a Halloween movie that thinks she has the kids cornered. And as she laughs the camera cuts in real close on Nolan’s face as he tries to keep a brave smile but you can tell he’s embarrassed. Fuck you Citrus and your stupid duct tape gown. Go to 1:03:00 to see this and hear that laugh. I hope Citrus stubs her toe every day for a year.
“This orange. Every time you see this orange you’re going to be changed here today. Never be the same. When you open it up there are numerous slices so imagine that each slice of the orange is one aspect of the fruit of the spirit. The original Greek word for fruit in Galatians 5 is karpos, and one definition means “a result of something.”
So is that the meaning of the orange? You know what, I know I said I’d stop calling her Citrus once she explains it but I don’t like her so she’s staying as Citrus in this cinematic universe.
“We were fortunate enough this morning to have some girl time together and your mom mentioned the word ‘manufacture’ which is so appropriate for today and the days ahead” Well shit, back to take another shower again to wash that one off me.
Now she’s talking about how not every day in marriage is perfect. Some days are full of “turbulence, flight delays, and even cancellations.” I hate you Citrus.
The idea is to bear the fruit of the spirit and staying connected to Jesus. “To manufacture this fruit involves the difficult task of denying self every day.”
“Foo foo, manufacture love. I’ve seen you love god and others by the way you serve. Now apply this to your marriage, and be selfless, giving, and devoted to putting Nolan’s needs above your needs.” - Bleh.
The whole gist of this is “Flannery, you gotta manufacture everything you want in life but you best not want anything Nolan doesn’t because that shit don’t matter.”
44 more minutes of this.
As she’s preaching she’s holding up the orange. She’s almost about to cry. Last thing Citrus says references Nolan as “flannery’s pilot.” go squeeze that orange into your eye, you goon.
And now trump hair boy is back. He is the groom’s brother-in-law. And why yes...his name is indeed Chad.
Chad is way older than nolan, like I’d say at least a decade older if not more, and his preaching is already sounding more fatherly than brotherly.
Man, the insidious framing of all of this. “Flannery, we all love you and we’re so glad that he chose such a perfect bride.” It completely takes away her agency and existence. Ugh.
Chad is talking about protecting Nolan from his mean sisters as a kid. Good lord, the bridesmaids dresses. Definitely in the grey family but then the shoulder overlay (shawl?) is just covered in shiny plasticy stars. What?
Oh, and now we’re making fun of Nolan’s childhood speech impediment. Thanks Chad. Chad in one sentence talks about helping Nolan say words correctly. In the next sentence he talks about joining in one the teasing. This guy sucks, and he has the body language of someone who thinks he’s sooooooooooooooooo funny.
Next story starts with a tale about Nolan’s toy pop gun as a kid and then Chad drops this gem.
“I don’t know how you understood what was going on, but you would watch Fox News, and every time they put a picture of Osama Bin Laden up there the little guy would go book it to his toy closet, would grab that little pop rifle, and he would just stand in front of the TV ‘pop!’ ‘pop!’ ‘pop!’”
Crowd laughed pretty good at that one.
Now he’s talking about them playing basketball against each other and how Nolan would excel at everything he put his mind to. And he tells how Nolan started to beat him at basketball despite being so much younger than him. He’s playing it for laughs but he’s not happy with this.
Chad was Nolan’s first drum teacher. “And once again I decided that this 10-year-old is NOT going to be a better drummer than me. He’s 10. Come on, gimme a break, he’s 10 years old. So then I retired from my drumsticks because whatever you set your mind to you excelled. It was sickening to the rest of us, but you excelled at everything you did and then god called you into the ministry.”
Yo Chad...do you like Nolan? That’s not a rhetorical question. That jealousy and anger wasn’t even hidden there. Why are you here if you don’t like this dude?
Chad says that Nolan can minister to anyone. That’s cool I guess.
He even makes a reference how he checked his phone before the ceremony and talks about how there’s over a thousand people watching. That would make me lose my mind.
“My wife and I have a passion and a calling to teach young people about the necessity of purity.” - That’s nice to hear.
Chad goes on about his wife and him travelling the country teaching people about purity and Nolan traveled with them as their drummer when he was like 11. Wow. Chad is so proud that purity was ingrained in Nolan’s mind. Ooof.
Everything about purity is gross.
“There’s many brides that walk down aisles as you have. They walk down the aisle to a good-looking, talented, muscular groom, but you, sweet sister-in-law, are about to receive a gift today that most brides don’t have the privilege to receive. The gift that far exceeds good lucks and muscles and talent, it’s the gift of purity.” - His voice cracked as he said this and then reads the purity card that Nolan signed as a teenager.
“My signature means that I will accept no substitutes, no lies, no imitations of real love. From this day forward I promise to protect my heart and my body for my future spouse. For better or for worse, for richer or poorer, in sickness and in health I forsake all others, in parenthesis it says and my hormones, for the person I will marry.”
“These cards mean more than anything else could mean to a young woman.” - God damn it’s so gross. Everything is so gross and disgusting with how they’re talking to Flannery.
And now Chad is finally ending. Good. He’s so gross. And he not so subtly hates his brother-in-law.
Finally into the final half hour of the proceedings now. And they not turn to look at each other and hold each other’s right hands. Looks like a real bad handshake.
Kenneth’s back to actually marry the two of them.
So they’re now legally married. The rings are on the fingers. There is still 27 minutes left of this video.
A booming female voice comes over the speakers: “L..I..F..E..LIFE! I want to spell and speak the things that bring life. Life, can we just say it, LIFE! L...I...F...E. LIFE! LIFE! GOD LET US SPEAK LIFE! LET US SPEAK LIFE I PRAY TODAY OH GOD! IF DEATH AND LIFE ARE IN THE POWER OF THE TONGUE GOD, LET US SPEAK LIFE!
This woman is screaming this at this point. Got damn is she loud and the piano is playing so I expect a song here. Maybe it’ll be Defying Gravity.
“GOD LET US USE OUR TONGUE IN EVERY WAY YOU MEANT IT TO BE USED. FOR POWER AND FOR AUTHORITY, OH GOD. - apparently the loud screaming voice was Flannery’s grandmother.
Now another pastor is speaking? The marriage is over. They’re hitched. This is Cory, the father of the bride.
Cory is quite boring.
Next guy walks up. His name is Shine. He is Flannery’s uncle.
Are any of these people funny? They’re all laughing at stuff but nothing is funny.
Shine retells the story of infant Flannery not being able to breathe and how everyone was panicking and didn’t know what to do, but ole Shine knew.
“I just grabbed ya and whacked ya as hard as I can.” (looks up at Nolan) “And if you need me to do that again I’m glad to help you out.” - I said “WHAT THE FUCK” out loud by myself on the couch when I heard that. Holy fucking shit this guy is an absolute dirtball. And the whole crowd, Flannery included, laughed at the comment. She’s in for a shit life.
Everything he’s saying boils down to “Flannery, save your time and emotions and energy and save them for Nolan and god.” Damn shame she’s never gonna have anything for herself.
Fuck you Shine, you dirtball little shit. He sure does like pump his own tires. He even called himself “the poem master.”
He is reciting the absolute worst poem I’ve ever heard. He thinks he’s spitting bars. He’s just shooting blanks.
“Tough times will come and they must be braved / I know Nolan’s mom will make sure he’s shaved / So get over your problems like they’re microwaved.”
I’m sure if Shine read this he would take the criticism well. Well, Shine, in case you do read this, you can’t write creatively because you think that you’re existence is all the creativity that you need. No, you need to take time to experience the world. But please, proudly keep talking about the time you beat on an infant. Jackass.
The families are now coming together to pray for the couple. Everyone walks right up to them and now people are screaming as they put their hands on the couple. The piano music swells. People are scat singing now. Tears are shed. Voices crack. I’m scared. Some man has two fingers on Flannery’s forehead. EVERYONE IS SCAT SINGING!!! Holy shit this is wild. Now someone is singing with the music outside of the crazy family. This is the least socially distant thing I’ve seen this pandemic. Religion like this needs to be in the DSM because this ain’t right. Is that a hand on Nolan’s neck now? I see you in the back there Chad, not doing anything. You can’t escape me you loser.
God dam, that was scary to see. That was horror movie unsettling. They’re both still going as the backup singers just keep saying “amen” over and over. Holy shit. And now everyone returns like nothing happened.
Kenneth finally presents them as a couple after 102 minutes of this.
The kiss is quite nice. Standard wedding kiss.
No Kenneth, do not offer another prayer, please. Please stop.
They turn. People cheer. She’s doomed to a life of being second class.
And now the couple walks up the aisle together arm in arm. And the band starts playing everyone out like it’s the end of Saturday Night Live.
submitted by SexySexSexMan to FundieSnark [link] [comments]


2020.07.30 14:41 aasqweedfcvv Hidden camera for adults only

To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 brand. 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1800-561-8025's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
"Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by aasqweedfcvv to u/aasqweedfcvv [link] [comments]


2020.07.30 14:23 aaswddfcvgg 𝟏𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 @@ binance us customer phone number

Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 brand. 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1800-561-8025's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
"Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by aaswddfcvgg to u/aaswddfcvgg [link] [comments]


2020.07.30 14:21 aaswddfcvgg 𝟏𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 @@ Binance us Tech Support Number

Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 brand. 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1800-561-8025's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
"Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by aaswddfcvgg to u/aaswddfcvgg [link] [comments]


2020.07.30 13:34 sderftyhhg Hidden camera for adults only

Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 brand. 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1800-561-8025's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
"Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by sderftyhhg to u/sderftyhhg [link] [comments]


2020.07.30 13:33 sderftyhhg 𝟏𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 @ Binance Phone Number

Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 brand. 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1800-561-8025's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
"Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Binance support number 𝐈𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Binance support number 𝟖𝟒𝟒*𝟗𝟎𝟕*𝟎𝟓𝟖𝟑 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by sderftyhhg to u/sderftyhhg [link] [comments]


2020.07.28 18:00 Badderlocks_ Ascended 11

Previous part
“Tell me again why you’re the one flying,” Lump said, teeth gritted as the small freighter hit yet another chunk of debris.
“Please. If you were flying, we’d all be dead by now,” Jonas said. He seemed far too relaxed for the situation they were in. “We’ll be fine. It’s just a few rocks.”
“Can you two for once please stay focused?” Eric called from the turret controls near the bunks at midship.
“What’s his deal?” Jonas muttered.
“His anniversary is coming up. He always gets grumpy around this time.”
“Didn’t he just see her?”
“I can hear you,” Eric said, irritated. “And that was for thirty minutes over two months ago. That hardly counts.”
Jonas turned to Lump. “Have you seen your family at all in the last two and a half years, Lumpy?”
“Not at all. You?”
“Not once.”
“Jonas, didn’t you sign up to get away from your mother?” Eric asked.
“I… uh… I don’t know what you’re talking about,” he said, trailing off for the last half of the sentence.
“What?”
“I said I’ve got something on the sensors!”
The subject change wasn’t just convenient, it was true. Some of the chunks of debris were starting to flare up brightly in multiple wavelengths.
“I see them,” Eric said. “Are these our guys?”
One of the computers in the cockpit buzzed loudly. “We’ve been hailed. Let’s find out.” He tapped in a few commands and opened a line of communication. Immediately, an alien voice started talking in the Peluthian language.
“Hey, hey, hey, wait!” Jonas interrupted. “This is a human vessel. What do you want from us?”
The voice on the other line paused. “Humans are the servants of the Peluthians. Your cargo is still forfeit. Surrender it to us peacefully, and we will allow you to join our rebellion. They do not need to be your masters,” it said in heavily accented English.
“Halinon accent,” Jonas called after muting his end of the communication. “And he’s trying to get us to defect. These are our guys.”
“Understood. Lump, get down to the cargo hold and get ready. Jonas, get me in position for a few shots.”
“Shots? Aren’t we supposed to surrender?” Jonas asked as Lump clanked down the metal ladder.
“We don’t want to make it seem too easy, do we?” Eric asked.
“Idiot is going to get us killed,” Jonas muttered.
“I can still hear you.”
“I said I’m moving into position, sir!” he said innocently.
The engines roared, protesting angrily as Jonas attempted a maneuver that was way too intricate for such a clumsy vessel. Eric could hear a loud thud as Lump fell down in the cargo hold below, and the metal hull strained at the sudden impulse.
“Easy, Jonas! This isn’t an SF 84!” he yelled. Below, Lump cursed violently.
Eric could see that the two Halinon vessels were just out of range of the ship’s two turrets, but he lazily aimed and started firing their way anyway. He didn’t expect anything to make it past the ship’s defenses, but this mission was all about appearances.
“I think you’re making them angry, Eric!” Jonas said.
“Good.”
The ships rapidly streaked towards their small freighter and began firing. Eric still wasn’t concerned; this was simple piracy, and it made no sense for them to destroy the goods.
“You really seem too relaxed about this. Should I try anything evasive?”
Eric snorted. “What, and nearly rip the ship in half again? I think you’re more dangerous than them at this point.
He heard the sound of rending metal as shots from the Halinon vessels began to contact the hull. Soon enough, he had twin warnings on the turret control consoles: TURRET OFFLINE. “We’re taking some serious hits,” Jonas warned.
“We’re fine. Relax,” Eric said, leaning back. “Although it probably wouldn’t hurt to put your helmet on. Just in case.”
“That’s supposed to help me relax?” Jonas grumbled. A flashing light caught his attention. “Sir, we’re being hailed again.”
“Put them through.”
It was the same alien as before
“Humans, your vessel is crippled. Stand down and allow us to board, and we will not harm you.”
“Alright, Jonas, let’s get to work. Launch the pod.”
Jonas punched in a few commands, and the freighter lurched to the side as the escape pod launched, navigating out of the debris field.
“Let’s get down to the cargo bay. Lump probably has everything ready by now.”
“I really hate this part,” Jonas complained as they descended the ladder.
Lump was waiting below. “Was all of that really necessary?” she asked as they approached.
“It’s all about the theatrics,” Eric said. “Don’t want them to be suspicious.”
She snorted. “Anyway, the ‘cargo’ is all ready.”
“What are we today?” Jonas asked.
Lump unlatched the lid on one of the cargo boxes. “Ammunition.”
“Thank god. I hate being food.”
“What’s wrong with being food?” Eric asked.
“I’m always worried they won’t take it, since it’s not very good for them. Besides, I’m still shaking rice out of my uniform.”
“Better than smelling like grease and metal,” Eric said, approaching one of the cargo bins. He lifted some of the boxes of ammunition inside. The top few layers were real cargo, but beneath was a weighted yet empty hollow, big enough for one person to hide inside uncomfortably.
“When I was a kid, I thought being a spy would be way more glamorous than this,” Jonas complained.
“We’re not spies. We’re special forces,” Eric replied.
“Emphasis on the ‘special’, apparently.”
“Look, it works. And if it looks stupid and it works…”
“...it isn’t stupid,” Lump and Jonas said in unison, rolling their eyes.
Eric sighed. “Just shut up and get in your box.”
The sides of the cargo box slid upwards, and it was nearly impossible to access the hidden hollow without knowing it was there. Fortunately, latches on the inside made it easy to get out at the appropriate moment which could be determined by observing the feeds from any of the small cameras hidden carefully on all sides of the cargo boxes.
All three of them climbed into their own boxes and shut the doors. Then, they waited.
“I always thought I would destroy my back by hunching over an office computer for most of my adult life,” Jonas said casually over the radio. “I have to say, this is a very unique way to achieve that.”
“You complain too much, Jonas,” Lump said.
“Someone has to keep you honest.”
“That doesn’t even make sense.”
“Yeah, but it sounds good.”
“Will you two shut up?” Eric asked, irritated. “They should be boarding any minute now.”
As if on cue, they heard a loud clank as one of the rebel vessels made contact with the freighter. Within a few moments, the hydraulics of the bay door hummed to life. The air in the bay hissed out through quickly expanding gap, and they were quickly exposed to the vacuum of space.
Eric’s breath felt unnaturally loud in the confined space of the cargo container. He tried his best to stay quiet as footsteps began to approach the boxes. He activated one of the cameras facing the door, and an image popped up in the corner of his visor.
He could see seven Halinon approach the boxes cautiously. Their armor and equipment were clearly scavenged; the armor was a series of patched-together pieces, often scarred or scorched in places, and he couldn’t even identify all of the weapons.
They began to speak. For the hundredth time, Eric felt grateful that he had been forced to continue learning the Halinon language and its most common dialects. It had saved the squad an uncountable number of times.
“Clear the rest of the ship and make sure this isn’t an ambush. You two, check the cargo boxes. See what we got.”
Eric held his breath as the two indicated Halinon approached the cargo boxes. One popped the latch of his box open and started to look inside.
“Ammunition, and a whole lot of it. No wonder they didn’t want to give it up so easily.”
The other five Halinon cleared the vessel quickly and came back to the cargo hold.
“It’s ammunition, sir. Good quality stuff, too. They were probably taking it to one of the front lines.”
“Good. Get this moved back to the ship, and be careful with it.”
Eric watched as one of the Halinon walked to a console on the cargo bay wall and shut off the ship’s artificial gravity and the cargo boxes slowly started to drift. The rest of the squad started to push the boxes out into the vacuum of space and then into their own ship.
The doors on the Halinon vessel shut and the cargo boxes thudded to the ground as they activated their own gravity systems. After some shuffling and rearranging of the boxes, the Halinon finally left them alone and sealed the cargo bay.
“No point in waiting. We have no idea if they’re coming back any time soon. Get out, and for fuck’s sake be quiet about it,” Eric whispered over the radio. He fumbled with the latch on one of the sides of his box, but the clumsy armored gloves finally managed to pull it, releasing the side and allowing him to push it up.
Jonas shortly joined him, but Lump was nowhere to be seen.
“Where are you?” Eric whispered.
One of the boxes rattled slightly.
“I can’t get it open. I think I’m boxed in,” she said. Eric and Jonas stared at the box.
“You know, if this weren’t a potential life and death situation, this would be hilarious,” Jonas whispered.
Eric ignored him. “We can’t move anything. It’ll make too much noise.”
“It’ll be a lot harder to take out this ship with the two of us,” Jonas said.
“And I would appreciate not being left in a small box,” Lump added.
Eric looked around the bay. It was dark, but a terminal near the door to the rest of the ship glowed slightly. “Jonas, see if there’s any way to shut off local gravity systems. I’m not expecting much from these hacked together pieces of junk, but it’s our best shot.”
Jonas crept over to the terminal and started to skim through the available commands. He wasn’t cursing out loud, but Eric knew he was under his breath. Jonas hated using alien computer systems, as they all did.
Eric looked around the room, hoping to find another solution or at least learn some more about the vessel they had boarded, but there was precious little around. There were a handful of cargo containers on board that had come from a different freighter, but he could tell little other than that they probably originated from a private corporation rather than any alien government.
“Eric, I got it,” Jonas suddenly called out quietly. “Are you ready?”
Eric moved over to the set of crates that Lump was trapped in. “Ready.” Jonas pressed a button, and Eric suddenly felt lighter. He pushed some of the boxes, and without the ship forcing them downwards, it was significantly easier to move them quietly. With a minimal amount of effort and noise, he had freed up one of the sides of Lump’s cargo container.
“You should be able to get out. Try this side,” he whispered, tapping the free side. Within a moment, she had unlatched it and crawled out.
“Now what?” she asked. It was a good question. They could try to move into the rest of the ship, but it would be difficult to leave the cargo bay quietly without turning the artificial gravity systems back on. However, if they did so, the boxes floating throughout the room would slam onto the ground, probably alerting everyone on the ship.
“We’ll just have to try extra hard to leave here quietly,” he said. “Get to the door.”
They floated up to the sealed door to the rest of the ship. Jonas was already there since the terminal was a few steps away.
“Get ready to open the door, Jonas,” Eric whispered as he and Lump tried their best to stay hidden on either side of the door. He prayed quietly that no one would be on the other side. It had been a while since he had fought in zero gravity, and it was not an experience he wanted to repeat.
He held up three fingers, then counted down. At zero, Jonas slapped the button to open the door, and it slid open with a small thunk. With some difficulty, Eric and Lump peered into the harshly lit hallway. Fortunately, there was no one there.
“Let’s go.” He carefully moved a foot into the hallway, where the ship’s gravity took over and brought it to the floor faster than he was expecting. The rubber padding on his foot absorbed most of the impact, but he still winced at the noise it made.
They filed into the hallway, watching the other doorways carefully, but no one came to investigate. Eric waved them forward to the first door.
Eric looked at the small terminal next to the door. “Looks like sleeping quarters. Try to jam it so we can deal with them later.”
Jonas looked at it. “I think… Yep. This is an emergency protocol. Should be able to spoof it into thinking there’s a hull breach. Let me just isolate it from the rest of the system so it doesn’t set off any alarms… Done.”
The next room was life support and other technical systems, but it was empty. They moved on.
A mess room was at the end of the hallway. They could hear the sounds of a few Halinon eating and talking.
Eric counted down again, and they burst out of the hallway and into the mess. The Halinon were caught completely by surprise, and two that were facing the opposite direction didn’t even react at first.
“Don’t move and we won’t have to shoot you all,” Eric said in their language. They obeyed and sat in stunned silence. “Jonas, watch them. Shoot anyone if they make a noise,” he added in Halin.
There was a ladder in the mess hall that apparently led straight to the cockpit, though the hatch was closed.
Eric cursed silently under his breath. Ladders were always annoying; you had to choose between climbing with one hand and aiming with another or climbing with both hands and hoping you could get up fast enough to not be shot first. Fortunately, the hatch was not locked by a terminal, so they didn’t have to coordinate pressing a button with breaching a ladder, a horrific endeavor that required at least a third hand.
Eric climbed the first few rungs, then pulled out his sidearm. It was a bulky affair since Peluthian weapons technology was not very miniturizable, but it offered slightly more maneuverability than the standard rifle that they had been using slight variations of for the last two years. He awkwardly grasped it with the rung, then prepared to shove hatch open.
With a grunt, he rammed through the hatch and vaulted into the cockpit. Only three Halinon were present, but one was already reaching for a weapon laying on the ground. Eric took careful aim and sent a volley of shots towards the alien. Three of them hit, sending the creature flying backwards. The other two stood rapidly, but he had aimed at them before they could do anything hostile.
“Don’t move,” he hissed in Halin. They stared at him, defeated.
“You were hiding in the cargo?” one asked as Lump climbed into the cockpit. He didn’t answer.
The alien cursed. “I told Telat to check them carefully. What do you want, human?”
“Move away from the computers. Stand against that wall. Watch them carefully, Lump.” She trained her gun on the two aliens as they stepped carefully away. Eric put his sidearm back in the holster on his side and moved to the computer, careful to not get within arm’s reach of the aliens.
“Locked. Of course,” he muttered. He turned to the Halinon prisoners. “What’s the password?”
“The what?” the second asked.
“The key, the string of information needed to get in. The system is locked. One of you must have been the one to do it.”
The aliens looked at each other. “We do not know what you speak of,” the first said
Eric sighed, then pulled out his gun and shot the second in the arm, blowing it off completely. Both Halinon flinched, though Eric knew now that the reaction was more surprise than pain.
“I hate it when you do that,” Lump said conversationally in English.
“Shut up. They might understand us,” he replied. Then, in Halin, “I have far more shots than you have arms. Would you like to go the next three cycles without being able to hold anything?”
The Halinon stared at his arm laying on the ground in a small puddle of brownish fluid. Then he looked at Eric.
“They told us you were civilized,” it said. “They said that you were willing to let prisoners of war go in peace if they surrendered.”
Eric smiled thinly. “We’re not at war anymore.” He shot another arm off. “Maybe, if you tell us the key, we will.”
“Savages,” the Halinon hissed. It began to list a series of characters in the Halin language, and Eric typed them carefully into the computer to unlock its data.
“There,” he said. “That wasn’t so hard, was it?” The Halinon stared at hi.
“Are we done here?” it asked.
Eric nodded. “Let’s get them down with the others,” he said to Lump in English. “Once they’re all corralled, we can continue.”
Together, they herded the two Halinon down the ladder and into the mess hall. Then, with Jonas’s help, they gathered the crowd and moved them into the cargo bay. Jonas quickly reactivated the artificial gravity systems in the bay and then disabled the terminal, denying the aliens access to the ship’s systems.
Eric started back towards the cockpit, but Jonas stopped him. “Shouldn’t we clear the sleeping quarters?”
Eric paused, then nodded. “You’re right. I doubt anything is in there, or we would have had to deal with them by now, but better safe than sorry.”
They lined up on either side of the door, then rushed in when Jonas opened it.
The figures inside were sleeping, but quickly awoke at the clamor.
“Stay down and-” Eric began, but was stunned into silence when he saw what was in the quarters.
They were humans.
submitted by Badderlocks_ to Badderlocks [link] [comments]


2020.07.28 15:29 provbyo For camera hidden adults only

Coinbase Pro support number ☎️(𝟖𝟕𝟕).(𝟖𝟒𝟔).(𝟐𝟖𝟏𝟕) ☠️ CoInBase prO ☠️ Coinbase Pro support number
Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.

To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 brand.

Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.

There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.

Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230's headquarters?

This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.

Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.

The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 office," he said.

Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"

Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.

Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."

Zhao said Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."

"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.

Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.

"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.

"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.

It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.

In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”

President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”

You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.

That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.

But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.

Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.

Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.

Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.

Yes, freedom matters

Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”

Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.

Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.

Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.

Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.

The excluded

But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.

An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.

Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.

And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.

Caring about privacy

Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.

Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.

To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.

But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.

Let’s talk about this, people.

A missing asterisk

Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.

So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.

Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.

Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by provbyo to u/provbyo [link] [comments]


2020.07.27 16:23 Initial-Community645 Hidden camera for adults only

Coinbase +𝟷𝟾𝟹𝟹-𝟺𝟷𝟶-𝟶𝟸𝟹𝟶 Pro Customer Support Number Helpline Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
Time was up. For an easy question to close, Shin asked where Zhao was working from during the coronavirus pandemic.
"I'm in Asia," Zhao said. The blank white wall behind him didn't provide any clues about where in Asia he might be. Shin asked if he could say which country – after all, it's the Earth's largest continent.
"I prefer not to disclose that. I think that's my own privacy," he cut in, ending the interview.
It was a provocative way to start the biggest cryptocurrency and blockchain event of the year.
In the opening session of Consensus: Distributed this week, Lawrence Summers was asked by my co-host Naomi Brockwell about protecting people’s privacy once currencies go digital. His answer: “I think the problems we have now with money involve too much privacy.”
President Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, now President Emeritus at Harvard, referenced the 500-euro note, which bore the nickname “The Bin Laden,” to argue the un-traceability of cash empowers wealthy criminals to finance themselves. “Of all the important freedoms,” he continued, “the ability to possess, transfer and do business with multi-million dollar sums of money anonymously seems to me to be one of the least important.” Summers ended the segment by saying that “if I have provoked others, I will have served my purpose.”
You’re reading Money Reimagined, a weekly look at the technological, economic and social events and trends that are redefining our relationship with money and transforming the global financial system. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here.
That he did. Among the more than 20,000 registered for the weeklong virtual experience was a large contingent of libertarian-minded folks who see state-backed monitoring of their money as an affront to their property rights.
But with due respect to a man who has had prodigious influence on international economic policymaking, it’s not wealthy bitcoiners for whom privacy matters. It matters for all humanity and, most importantly, for the poor.
Now, as the world grapples with how to collect and disseminate public health information in a way that both saves lives and preserves civil liberties, the principle of privacy deserves to be elevated in importance.
Just this week, the U.S. Senate voted to extend the 9/11-era Patriot Act and failed to pass a proposed amendment to prevent the Federal Bureau of Investigation from monitoring our online browsing without a warrant. Meanwhile, our heightened dependence on online social connections during COVID-19 isolation has further empowered a handful of internet platforms that are incorporating troves of our personal data into sophisticated predictive behavior models. This process of hidden control is happening right now, not in some future "Westworld"-like existence.
Digital currencies will only worsen this situation. If they are added to this comprehensive surveillance infrastructure, it could well spell the end of the civil liberties that underpin Western civilization.
Yes, freedom matters
Please don’t read this, Secretary Summers, as some privileged anti-taxation take or a self-interested what’s-mine-is-mine demand that “the government stay away from my money.”
Money is just the instrument here. What matters is whether our transactions, our exchanges of goods and services and the source of our economic and social value, should be monitored and manipulated by government and corporate owners of centralized databases. It’s why critics of China’s digital currency plans rightly worry about a “panopticon” and why, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, there was an initial backlash against Facebook launching its libra currency.
Writers such as Shoshana Zuboff and Jared Lanier have passionately argued that our subservience to the hidden algorithms of what I like to call “GoogAzonBook” is diminishing our free will. Resisting that is important, not just to preserve the ideal of “the self” but also to protect the very functioning of society.
Markets, for one, are pointless without free will. In optimizing resource allocation, they presume autonomy among those who make up the market. Free will, which I’ll define as the ability to lawfully transact on my own terms without knowingly or unknowingly acting in someone else’s interests to my detriment, is a bedrock of market democracies. Without a sufficient right to privacy, it disintegrates – and in the digital age, that can happen very rapidly.
Also, as I’ve argued elsewhere, losing privacy undermines the fungibility of money. Each digital dollar should be substitutable for another. If our transactions carry a history and authorities can target specific notes or tokens for seizure because of their past involvement in illicit activity, then some dollars become less valuable than other dollars.
The excluded
But to fully comprehend the harm done by encroachments into financial privacy, look to the world’s poor.
An estimated 1.7 billion adults are denied a bank account because they can’t furnish the information that banks’ anti-money laundering (AML) officers need, either because their government’s identity infrastructure is untrusted or because of the danger to them of furnishing such information to kleptocratic regimes. Unable to let banks monitor them, they’re excluded from the global economy’s dominant payment and savings system – victims of a system that prioritizes surveillance over privacy.
Misplaced priorities also contribute to the “derisking” problem faced by Caribbean and Latin American countries, where investment inflows have slowed and financial costs have risen in the past decade. America’s gatekeeping correspondent banks, fearful of heavy fines like the one imposed on HSBC for its involvement in a money laundering scandal, have raised the bar on the kind of personal information that regional banks must obtain from their local clients.
And where’s the payoff? Despite this surveillance system, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that between $800 billion and $2 trillion, or 2%-5% of global gross domestic product, is laundered annually worldwide. The Panama Papers case shows how the rich and powerful easily use lawyers, shell companies, tax havens and transaction obfuscation to get around surveillance. The poor are just excluded from the system.
Caring about privacy
Solutions are coming that wouldn’t require abandoning law enforcement efforts. Self-sovereign identity models and zero-knowledge proofs, for example, grant control over data to the individuals who generate it, allowing them to provide sufficient proof of a clean record without revealing sensitive personal information. But such innovations aren’t getting nearly enough attention.
Few officials inside developed country regulatory agencies seem to acknowledge the cost of cutting off 1.7 billion poor from the financial system. Yet, their actions foster poverty and create fertile conditions for terrorism and drug-running, the very crimes they seek to contain. The reaction to evidence of persistent money laundering is nearly always to make bank secrecy laws even more demanding. Exhibit A: Europe’s new AML 5 directive.
To be sure, in the Consensus discussion that followed the Summers interview, it was pleasing to hear another former U.S. official take a more accommodative view of privacy. Former Commodities and Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo said that “getting the privacy balance right” is a “design imperative” for the digital dollar concept he is actively promoting.
But to hold both governments and corporations to account on that design, we need an aware, informed public that recognizes the risks of ceding their civil liberties to governments or to GoogAzonBook.
Let’s talk about this, people.
A missing asterisk
Control for all variables. At the end of the day, the dollar’s standing as the world’s reserve currency ultimately comes down to how much the rest of the world trusts the United States to continue its de facto leadership of the world economy. In the past, that assessment was based on how well the U.S. militarily or otherwise dealt with human- and state-led threats to international commerce such as Soviet expansionism or terrorism. But in the COVID-19 era only one thing matters: how well it is leading the fight against the pandemic.
So if you’ve already seen the charts below and you’re wondering what they’re doing in a newsletter about the battle for the future of money, that’s why. They were inspired by a staged White House lawn photo-op Tuesday, where President Trump was flanked by a huge banner that dealt quite literally with a question of American leadership. It read, “America Leads the World in Testing.” That’s a claim that’s technically correct, but one that surely demands a big red asterisk. When you’re the third-largest country by population – not to mention the richest – having the highest number of tests is not itself much of an achievement. The claim demands a per capita adjustment. Here’s how things look, first in absolute terms, then adjusted for tests per million inhabitants.
Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 has frozen funds linked to Upbit’s prior $50 million data breach after the hackers tried to liquidate a part of the gains. In a recent tweet, Whale Alert warned Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 that a transaction of 137 ETH (about $28,000) had moved from an address linked to the Upbit hacker group to its wallets.
Less than an hour after the transaction was flagged, Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230, announced that the exchange had frozen the funds. He also added that Coinbase support number 1833-410-0230 is getting in touch with Upbit to investigate the transaction. In November 2019, Upbit suffered an attack in which hackers stole 342,000 ETH, accounting for approximately $50 million. The hackers managed to take the funds by transferring the ETH from Upbit’s hot wallet to an anonymous crypto address.
submitted by Initial-Community645 to u/Initial-Community645 [link] [comments]


2020.07.27 15:48 Professional-Oven-44 For camera hidden adults only

Hi everyone, so basically I’m not sure what to do/ how to approach this subject and any advice is greatly appreciated! My son and I live rent-free in my parents house, which I am very grateful for and is a huge help. Because of this I feel bad complaining but at the same time I feel like my privacy is being violated.
The first instance occurred a couple of months ago. I have a personal journal that I was writing notes and personal things in. It’s important to note that these notes were about witchcraft. After being raised Catholic and having that religion forced upon me my whole life I had finally found a practice I really connected with and enjoyed learning about. Long story short, my mom read the whole journal. However, she didn’t confront me about anything, I had to ask her why she was acting strange and then she finally told me. I also bought a deck of Tarot cards. One day I left them in a common area (my bad) but also kind of hidden. I left and when I came back home my tarot cards were gone. Keep in mind I had just bought them and was super excited to use them. I went into my mom’s room and calmly asked her where they were. She told me to go away and that we’d talk tomorrow. I went back and searched for another 10 minutes. Finally I got fed up. Went back to her room and asked again where they were. She springs out of bed, yelling at me to GET OUT and physically pushes me out of her room. At this point I’m really angry, but I finally found them (she had hidden them really well). This is where I went too far and let my anger get the best of me. After finding them I took a picture of the deck to send to her. The card “the fool” was on top. So I sent her “found them! I’d love to give you a reading some day. Seems like the top card really pertains to you!” 2 minutes later my dad bursts into my room and stands over me, red in the face he’s yelling so hard, cursing at me etc until I’m crying. He was basically telling me if I’m going to do that shit to get out of their house, and that I’m going to hell and fun stuff like that. Luckily my son was sleeping in the next room over and didn’t wake up. That night I gathered mine and my son’s things and moved out. I completely understand that maybe they didn’t understand/ had misconceptions about witchcraft and tarot cards. But I can’t justify them treating me like that.
I moved back in a month later because things had simmered down. Fast forward to now. A couple of days ago my parents installed cameras all around the house. Now I completely understand that lots of people do this for security reasons but they didn’t tell us they were putting them in. I kind of just had to discover it myself. It feels like they’re trying to spy on me/ my sister (who’s 19) which really grosses me out and makes me uncomfortable. This isn’t that big of a deal though because like I said, they’re probably just doing it for security reasons.
They have a WiFi system called Eero. Now I don’t really know anything about it because I’m not tech savvy. All I know is that they are blocking websites. For example, I went on OnlyFans a couple of days ago thinking about creating one because I’m broke. Today I tried to log on and the website had been blocked. My boyfriend also discovered that they had blocked a couple of other adult websites. I feel like somehow they have access to our histories and my privacy feels VERY invaded. I mean, I’m 20 years old. I’m a whole ass adult and make my own choices. Then again I go back to the whole “it’s their house and I’m living here for free. Do I really have the right to complain?”
What do you think reddit- should I try to approach them and talk to them about how I feel like my privacy is being invaded and I’m being treated like a child? Or do I just try to save up for an apartment and deal with it in the meantime? Any insight or advice is very much appreciated.
TLDR: My mom read my private journal & hid my tarot cards from me. My parents installed cameras in our home without telling anyone and have been blocking “adult” websites. They blocked onlyfans a day after I visited it which leads me to believe they have access to my internet history. Should I confront them or deal with it?
submitted by Professional-Oven-44 to relationships [link] [comments]